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reports and plenty of speculation about who might be helping north cia korea in their technology. of course it is almost impossible to get information out of north korea. it is an incredibly isolated, closed regime. the information officially we get from that country is through its state-run media. so nothing gets out of north korea unless it is choreographed through k cna, the state-run news agency and the state-run television and it is highly choreographed and many would say propaganda. what we hear from north korea is what north korea wants the world to hear. it is very difficult to get an indication on that. here in seoul, one senior government official told me they are concerned, even with failure that north korea carrying out with rocket launches they are still learning. they are learning from mistake and can get better. this is a trial and era for north korea. the more they do, even if they are failures in the yeas of the international community they are still learning from them. >> paula hancocks reporting live in south korea. we have this just in from our erin burnett wh
to justice. where do we stand? >>> also, a new hollywood movie highlights the work of a cia analyst credited with tracking down osama bin laden, but here's a big but, it also sheds some very serious light on in-fighting in the spy agency. you got to hear it to believe it. let's go "outfront." >>> i'm ashleigh banfield in tonight for erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, our top developing story, we are just learning now that president obama and the white house or rather, president obama and the house speaker have spoken tonight. good news. this after they each fired another shot in the ongoing fight over how to resolve this fiscal cliff mess. cnn is now getting details about two new offers that were made and previously undisclosed, too. they kept a pretty tight lid on them. one of them by president obama, that was yesterday, then a counteroffer by the speaker. that was today. all of this as the president tells abc news tonight that he is confident that republicans will not hold middle class tax cuts hostage. so there's a lot of news that's all of a sudden coming out. after some relative quiet. o
blow in their own backyard. >>> a new movie has controversy surrounding around the cia analyst credited with finding osama bin laden and a sex abuse verdict topples the wall of secrecy that surrounded an ultraorthodox jewish sect. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> first this just coming into cnn. word that michigan's governor has just signed a law that many believe will significantly weaken union power in the state. one of the organized labor movements few remaining strongho strongholds. there was massive protests as lawmakers approved a so-called right to work law which allows members to forego paying dues. poppy harlow is in lansing in the state capital for us. you just spoke to the governor about all of this. what did he tell you? >> reporter: well, i spoke with the governor just ahead of that announcement where he confirmed that he indeed did sign this legislation into lawmaking michigan a right to work state. a sea change for this state, wolf. the governor saying this is a "opportunity" to stand up for workers and flying in the face of what many of those workers
team of katherine bigelow and mark bowe recreates how it all happened, from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the film makers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the film makers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how exactly did you source that story. >> reporter: katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a film maker? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly try to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went
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cia officer bob baer. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. eóoç=Ñp there's the sign to the bullpen. here he comes. you wouldn't want your doctor doing your job, the pitch! whoa! so why are you doing his? only your doctor can determine if your persistent heartburn is actually something more serious like acid reflux disease. over time, stomach acid can damage the lining of your esophagus. for many, prescription nexium not only provides 24-hour heartburn relief, but can also help heal acid-related erosions in the lining of your esophagus. talk to your doctor about the risk for osteoporosis-related bone fractures and low magnesium levels with long-term use of nexium. possible side effects include headache, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. other serious stomach conditions may still exist. let your doctor do his job. and you do
? peter bergen joins me ahead and so does former cia officer bob baer. >>> the australian radio hosts behind the prank call to a british hospital speak out about the tragic suicide of the nurse who took the call. what they're saying to her family when we continue. >>> some major film critics are raving about a new movie "zero dark 30" that is a fictional account of the decades-long manhunt for osama bin laden. zero dark 30 is a code by the military for half past midnight. the movie hasn't opened in theaters yet but already pulling in awards and is expected to be an oscar contender. >> you really believe this story? osama bin laden? >> yeah. >> the movie is also stirring up controversy because of a torture scene. the movie contains some extremely graphic scenes of a cia officer interrogating an al qaeda detainee. waterboarding, sleep deprivation beatings and other physical abuse and torture are in detail leaving some to ask, does the film go too far and is it accurate in talking about the use of abusive or enhanced interrogation techniques in the hunt for osama bin laden and in ultimat
scenes of a cia officer interrogating a detainee. other abuse and torture is shown in detail, leaving in doubt does it go to too far and is it accue in the interrogation and torture techniques in the hunt for osama bin laden and finding osama bin laden. peter bergen was an unofficial adviser in the him. his new book is "man hunt." he joins me now with former cia officer bob behr. you have seen the movie, i have seen it as well. you were an an paid adviser. what did they get wrong? there was a lot of reporter the screen writer did to kind of suss out the facts. in terms of the torture sequence were that right in that waterboarding led to the information that led to bin laden. >> not according to the senate intelligence committee. the film is a great film and it covers a lot of themes about the war on terror and the decade-long struggle against al qaeda. as a sort of overall picture, there's a lot of things that are good about the film. but the fact that is senate intelligence committee which has spint three years investigating the claim that coercive techniques led to bin laden amongst
in cairo, reza sayah, thank you. >>> in the movie about the bin laden raid, she is the hero. but in the cia, apparently not all roses for this agent. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. >>> many americans out of work are bracing for january 1st when benefits stop. >> it is what it is. >> the personal side of the fiscal cliff. >>> and just moments ago, the rock and roll hall of fame just announced its brand-new class. we'll show you what happened. searching for a bank designed for investors like you? tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 schwab bank was built with all the value and convenience tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 investors want. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like no atm fees, worldwide. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and no nuisance fees. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus deposit checks with mobile deposit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and manage your cash and investments tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with schwab's mobile app. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 no wonder schwab bank has grown to over 70 billion in assets. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so if you're looking for a bank that's in your corner, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 not just on the corner... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550
's people that think it's loose talk to encourage an intervention in syria. we'll talk to a former cia officer about that and sanjay gupta. plus an activist inside syria and what he has to say about the potential threat, next. oç=Ñp >>> syria's government is under scrutiny tonight as the world awaits the a sad's next move. as we told you last night, nbc news is reporting that syria's actually loading chemical weapons in to bombs. cnn has not confirmed the nbc report. all of this comes amid a string of opposition victories. recently they took control of key oil fields, saw advances in aleppo and reports suggest they surround the capital of damascus. one opposition spokesman told cnn they started what they believe to be the end battle of this war. if the intelligence on the chemical weapons, though, is true, the latest advances by the opposition seem to add incentives to the syrian government to use them. the assad regime denies having chemical weapons, and claims the reports are being used to justify an international invasion. after more than 20 months of fighting and more than 40,
team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how did you source that story. >> katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a filmmakerer? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly tried to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went wrong her
with cnn contributor and former cia officer bob baer and on the phone fran townsend. barbara, i know you're working to confirm this nbc report. how much would this change the situation? if u.s. military is going to act to prevent assad from gassing his own people, it would seem, if they loaded this stuff into weapons, the time to do it would be at hand. >> right now i can tell you, anderson, if this turns out to be true, even if not, the u.s. military, the cia in a full-blown effort to collect every piece of intelligence they can about what is going on with the chemical weapons and develop a targeting strategy if it were to come to that. so, what are we talking about here, anderson? they have to put together targeting options for the president. that involves the latest intelligence. where are the chemical weapons in syria? what would you do to attack them? what kind of u.s. bomber aircraft would you use? do you know precisely where they are? how would you get it past air defenses? israel, turkey, jordan, neighboring countries, their intelligence services also working this problem around
.s. military, the cia in a full blown effort to collect the intelligence and develop a targeting strategy, they have to put together targeting options for the president. that involves the latest intell jengs. what would you do to attack them? do you know where they are? how will you get that past syrian air defenses? there is a lot we know, there is growing concern by the hour in the region. because, if the syrians use these kinds of weapons on their own people, catastrophic. but the plume clouds can cross borders. terrorists can get ahold of this material. and it just doesn't get more serious than this. >> bob, you have been looking to how catastrophic these weapons can be. >> anderson, look at it this way. a 122 mm artillery round landing in the city will kill 18 to 20,000 people. >> one round? >> one round. you could take out a city a third of the city in the first couple of hours. this is a highly toxic liquid. it is a persistent a gent and completely deadly. if in fact they mixed the agent, it doesn't do you good to bomb these sites. if they are sitting in cities or near cities, it w
wire is a sports analyst. chad sweet is a former cia director of operations. and ken baer is a white housed a virus. todd carmichael is the host of dangerous grounds. howard kurtz will join us. and economic diane swonk rounds things out for us today. "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. let's begin with developing news this morning. a tsunami threat to tell you about was just lifted in japan. the country was rocked by a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake. it hit off the coast of tokyo. the buildings there shaking. you could see some of the video showing the degree to which they were shaking. alex, what's the latest? >> reporter: it has been a very, very tense few hours here in japan after you mentioned a 7.3 magnitude earthquake striking late here in the day on friday. but just in the past 90 minutes or so, the all clear has been given. the tsunami warning has been lifted. that's great news for the people here. there's no signs of any significant damage. no reports of any deaths. just a few injuries at this point. we also have to keep in mind the nu
for osama bin laden "zero dark 30." this year of the cia agent a little more complicated than the hollywood spy version portrayal. the post says she was actually passed over for a poe motion shortly after the mission that killed bin laden. also it says she took heat for ties to filmmakers and there was jealousy over her fame and that led to internal friction within the agency. the post says after being given a prestigious award for her work this agent sent an e-mail to dozens of others saying they didn't deserve to share in the accolades. >> not good. >> not getting along very well inside the cia, apparently. >> in the a smart move either. >>> for an expanded look at all of our top stories, head to cnn.com/earlystart. also follow us on twitter and on facebook. just search for early start cnn. >> it's made of steel but it's not a steal by any means. the gift card craze that has some coffee lovers paying way more than face value. look! over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum to help leave glasses sparkling. cascade. the clear choice. but when i
former cia operative and contributor bob bayer to show you what the impact of a single shell of gas would be in launched on homs in syria. the large swath of the city that would be affected. it's estimated about 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to barbara starr. and barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario because if there were to be god forbid a chemical attack, the concern is some could drift across borders. worse even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and have a full fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that
. "outfront" tonight, national security contributor fran townsend who is on the cia and homeland security external advisory board and noah shachtman. noah, what do we think is going on right now? at what point are they in this process? >> so the assad regime has hundreds of metric tons of the building blocks of sarin. basically two big building blocks. there's isopropanol which is rubbing alcohol and phosphorous compounds. those are kept separately in order to keep things safe. but the assad regime in small, limited quantities appears to have combined those two chemicals to make deadly sarin nerve agent and has loaded them on to aerial bombs. >> if that is true, fran, it's a very provocative thing. is it provocative enough that the u.s. now has to consider action? >> well, you know, the administration has not made it clear. what the president has said is that the use of such weapons would be a red line for the united states and her allies. but it's not clear, short of use, is this preparation, is the mixing of the precursor chemicals enough? as noah can tell you this is a very unstable su
on what a chemical attack by bashar al assad would actually look like. we have a picture from former cia operative bob baer here to show you. this is showing you what the single impact of saren gas would be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the bo
? national security contributor, fran townsend, is a member of the cia. cedrick layton member of the joipt staff. what are those consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> well, it is, look, the most recent information suggests they're preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem because now, a military strike could trigger the dissemination of such weapons. what you have to do now is is get the timely tactical intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. that is get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very ask, very difficult, but now, that's the position we're really in. >> just to be honest, hasn't really seemed to be at least totally aware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there was a wmd commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the committee. there are standards for assessing the credibility of sources. for how an analyst assesses a source and the information. and we know from the pre
an intervention in syria. we'll talk to a former cia officer about that and sanjay gupta. plus an activist inside syria and what he has to say about the potential threat, next. i'm doing my own sleep study. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. [ female announcer ] holiday cookies are a big job. everything has to be just right. perfection is in the details. ♪ get to holiday fun faster with pillsbury cookie dough. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they wa
, former cia officer bob baer and dr. sanjay gupta. we talked about this last night, but explain again what one warhead filled with sarin could do. >> one of these shells and the standard shell the syrians put this in is a 122 millimeter shell, a standard artillery piece. if they were to drop this into a dense area, into damascus or a suburb of homs, it doesn't matter which town, it will instantly kill 18,000 within the first few minutes. >> from one shell? >> one single shell would immediately kill 18,000 people. you know, this is a liquid. it's dispersed. it sticks on you. you get a few -- a little bit in your system, and you're dead. >> sanjay, what does it do to somebody who comes in contact with it? >> it affects receptors in the brain, and let me preface it by saying it's odorless and tasteless and it's colorless. it's hard to even know, you know, that it's there because of those things. also by touching it as bob was talking about, but also by inhaling it or eating food or drinking water contaminated with it, you can also get poisoned. you see this is a substance that can affect you
. is it too late? national security contributor fran townsend is a member of the cia and homeland security external advisory board and colonel cedric layton is a member of the staffs. what are the consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> it is. the most recent information suggests they're actually preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing sarin gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem, right? now a military strike could inadvertently trigger the dissemination of such weapons, what you have to do is get the intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very big ask from the intelligence community and very difficult. that's the positive we're really in. >> the intelligence community which to be honest hasn't really seemed to be at least, you know, totally aaware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there's been -- there was a commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the intelligence communit
is that the hollywood people got access to cia operatives, to cia locations, that they had access to the navy s.e.a.l.s which they should not have had. i can't really go beyond that over to say the investigation has gone on an expanded. >> ahead, we're going to talk a little bit about this movie and whether or not that's the case. you know, i wonder if national security was really compromised. >> it's been a consistent conversation. not just about this movie, right? we've had it several times. is there information coming from the administration that constantly seems to be in a positive light and does that information go beyond and risk national security issues? i think it's a legitimate debate. >> okay. fine, what is it then? like what? we keep saying it's possible, possible national security. like what? >> we've covered it extensively. >> like what? >> the kill list, we've talked about the details of the operation to kill anwar al awlaki, the cyber attack on iran, whenever it's positive we get to hear a lot about it. >> the kill list was reported during the administration of president george w
the legacy of all of the bureaucrat particular power. >> former cia official says in recent month kim has purging 200 top officials, including powerful generals who had been loyal to his father. >> generals that are being elevated indeed are a bit more hardcore, hardlined than the generals that were originally in place. so if anything it's an indication that north korea is not going to be any more reform-minded under kim jong-unthan his spread says fors. >> in fact, he's a hardliner who got his fingerprints on the 2010 warship by north korea and the shelling of a disputedisland which killed four south koreans, wolf. he's kwn as a pretty bellicose general. >> people are worried about it right now. let's say they develop a missile with a warhead potentially capable of reaching the united states. what are the u.s. capabilities in terms of defending itself against such a missile? >> leon panetta said that the u.s. is very confident if north korea were to launch a missile at the united states, the american military could guard against it. that's a major reason why they are bolstering their pre
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
's talk about the cia and whether there was a flap there with the talking points. focusing on susan rice does not get us on where we need to be on fixing the problems we have so that benghazi never occurs again. >> maria cardona and ron bonjean. thank you very much. >>> if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, we'll feel it even at our airports. flights could change, and quite frankly, not in a good way. in. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit fastreliefchallenge.com today for a special trial offer. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. (announcer) when subaru owners look in the mirror, relieving the pain quickly. they see more than themselves. so we celebrate our year-end with the "share the love" event. get a great deal on a new subaru and 250 dollars goes to your choice of five charities. by the en
, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporter: now, we've heard repeatedly from u.s. administration officials, u.s. president barack obama, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton that the use of chemical weapons in syria was a red line for which syria and the bashar al assad regime would face severe consequences if they ever did cross that red line and utilize chemical weapons against the people of syria. >> and we have no idea what those severe consequences would be, right? >> reporter: that's right, we don't. you know, people speculate that this would mean some type of military intervention, but we also know that a lot of world powers have not wanted to intervene
to the cia and department of homeland security. general marks, let me start with you. what are the military options at this stage right now? realistically, what could the use, nato, the international community militarily do if there is an indication that the syrian military's about to use chemical weapons against its own people. >> wolf, that's the key point. in advance of its use what can the u.s. do? and it's clearly having a very robust, very broad intelligence collection apparatus that takes into account all means of collection, technical as well as human intelligence. there are known sites where the chemical weapons are stockpiled, where the production sites are. then there has to be an act to marry those up with the distribution or delivery means. >> a missile. >> a missile, artillery shell, put into a bomb then uploaded under the wings of an aircraft. all those are indicators of what might occur. intelligence has to be very, very robust in order to go after that. then, if it is such that we see that happening in a tactical sense, in other words, there's not much time to respond, we h
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)